Debunking 3 Myths About the Female Orgasm

Image via Pexels.com

Let’s face it: sex is still taboo. In the Philippines, at least. Despite our country’s surprisingly progressive approach towards other sensitive issues like mental health and discrimination, the mere thought of bringing up the deed with our parents or friends can still make a lot of us cringe.

Our collective reaction towards discussing sex could be blamed on the household’s treatment of it, but many will agree that it isn’t the root cause.  Sex education in the Philippines isn’t as helpful as we’d want it to be. As a result, when we do talk about sex, people make false claims based on century-old myths that medical professionals have long since proven untrue.

The Female Orgasm

Image via Pexels.com

One of the sex-related topics most subject to false claims is a woman’s Big O. We have heard so many things about orgasms that are either really great or really bad. Either way, spreading lies could affect a woman’s (or her partner’s) sexual experience that could possibly lead to unnecessary frustrations and trauma.

Female sexuality shouldn’t be kept a secret. Here are a few common myths about a woman’s climax and the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth:

MYTH:

All women have vaginal orgasms. If you can’t peak during intercourse, there’s something wrong with you.

FACT:

Not the case. Sexual medicine specialist Linda Banner, Ph.D. says that having an orgasm all the time isn’t the norm. There will be days when we’ll feel too distracted, tired, or stressed to come close to a climax.

MYTH:

Everyone can “squirt,” it’s just a matter of trying or not trying hard enough. Because “ejaculation” and “squirting” are two same things.

FACT:

This is, by far, the most absurd thing I’ve heard people say about female orgasms. According to Dr. Samuel Salam, a French sex research and gynecologist, there is a difference between “female ejaculation” and “squirting.”

Female ejaculation is the milky substance from the prostate. “Squirting,” on the other hand, is a yellow liquid that contains urea, creating, and uric acid. It comes from – you guessed it! – the bladder. So, in short, “squirting” is sort of like peeing.

And no, not all women can “squirt.” Or rather, not all women will be in the right disposition to do so. And that’s alright.

MYTH:

This guy on Facebook thinks orgasms, themselves, are myths.

FACT:

All women are collectively laughing at you, Kyle. Sayonara.

Image from Pexels

For the longest time, the female orgasm has always been conflated with a man’s penis when, in fact, it could exist fine without it. It may seem like a small thing to talk about a woman’s orgasms, but debunking these myths brings us one step closer to empowering the female sexuality instead of being ashamed of it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.