Kedma Dead Sea Mask vs. Frizzy Hair: Which Will Win?

Mud Mask vs. Frizz: Let’s put it to the test
Image from Kedma Cosmetics Philippines

Frizzy hair is my life-long companion. Whether I stay indoors or outdoors, comb it once or ten times, let it down or tie it up, my hair doesn’t lose its gritty texture or pouf. To make matters more complicated, I have incredibly thick hair (no hair fall woes here, thankfully).

Volume + frizz isn’t an attractive combination.

The frizz doesn’t bother me much, though. The only solutions I resort to are 1) rock a low-maintenance haircut and 2) limit shampoo to three times a week. No salon treatments or special products.

Still, I’d love to know if there’s a product that can combat the stubborn buhaghag and give me the bagsak hair most women want.

So for this review, I’m trying out the Kedma Mud Hair Mask, which claims that it prevents moisture loss (the leading cause of frizz) and give the hair a shiny, natural look.

What Makes It So Special?

Not many products can give you the nutrients of the Dead Sea, that’s why the Mud Hair Mask stands out from the rest. The mask, according to the Kedma website, restores essential elements to damaged hair. Because I walk the streets of Makati every day for at least an hour, my hair really needs that TLC. On top of that, the mud mask also has Vitamin A, which retains the hair’s moisture and prevents the frizz.

I know what you’re thinking: it’s mud.  Isn’t it gross to put mud on your hair?

I’ll start the review on a high note: even if Dead Sea Mud Silt is high up in the ingredients list, the mask hardly looks, feels, or smells like mud.

The Look: Luxurious or Lacklustre?

The mud mask contains no hint of mud
Photo from the writer

The mask’s see-through container and gold lid makes for a truly luxurious packaging. I don’t have a bathroom vanity, but I’m sure that it would look fabulous on a bathroom sink beside fancy perfumes and essential oil bottles.

The packaging is also hygienic. Once you unscrew the lid, the product is covered with a clear piece of plastic to prevent contamination.

And for a product that’s made up of mud, the mask isn’t muddy at all. No sediment, no silt settling at the bottom. The texture is consistent; it’s like pureed oatmeal. The fragrance is heavenly. It even overpowered my shampoo or conditioner.

For the texture, fragrance, and overall IG-worthiness of the product, I give it five out of five stars.

The Use: Easy-Peasy or Tough?

I followed the instructions on the packaging strictly. I used it two times a week after shampooing (Wednesday and Sundays are my shampoo days), massaged it gently for eight minutes, then rinsed it off. I recommend using a plastic spoon to scoop the product and prevent contamination.

The first thing I noticed is that the product disappears instantly as I apply it to my hair. After a few strokes, I faced the mirror and saw no trace of the mask on the strands.

Its fragrance filled the bathroom, so that bit’s nice. Applying this lovely mask was the closest to self-care my hair could get — I didn’t mind the extra eight minutes it added to my routine.

Rinsing was a bit of a problem. Though the mask came off easily from my hair, soap suds were all over the bathroom floor. I’m not one to leave the shower messy, so the eight minutes extended to 10 as I directed the suds to the drain.

The mask was easy to apply and rinse, but it did leave a bit of mess afterward. So I give it four and a half out of five stars.

The Results: Nothing or Amazing?

I used the product for four weeks, and I’ve noticed three subtle changes:

  1. My hair was easier to comb
  2. It was fragrant
  3. The frizz tamed — a bit

Finger-Comb Action

After using the mask, my fingers ran smoothly through my hair — no knots, no tangles (mind you, I didn’t use any conditioner). This is a feat, given that tangles are expected after taking a bath and massaging the hair for eight minutes.

For somebody who doesn’t comb much, smooth, knot-free hair is a welcome change. The bad news is this smoothness only lasts for about two days.

Fragrance

I can’t get enough of the fragrance. My hair still smells wonderful even after braving the streets for half an hour.

Even if the scent doesn’t last the entire day, I’m still impressed. Not many conditioners and shampoo fragrances can withstand the smoke and smog of the city.

Frizz

As I’ve mentioned, the frizz tamed, but not as much as a salon treatment.

I started out with frizzy, buhaghag hair. In this photo, I tried to tame my mane with rigourous finger-combing, but the waves and grit won’t go away:

Wind-swept and gritty. No finger-combing could remove the frizz
Photo from the writer

A week into the review, I could already see a small difference:

Week One: Still frizzy, but a little tamer
Photo from the writer

After three weeks, I can comfortably take a picture without finger-combing my hair:

Week Three: Much of the frizz has gone
Photo from the writer

And after four weeks, the waves were a little smoother, and fewer hair strands were jutting out:

Week Four: A lot less frizzy compared to week one
Photo from the writer

Because I didn’t change any product in my hair care routine, I could only attribute the decrease in frizziness to the Kedma Mud Hair Mask.

What Didn’t It Do?

For all the fragrance and frizz-fighting that it did, the mask failed to make my hair look shinier. It retained the same look it did, even after a month of use.

The mask improved the frizz, made my hair easier to comb and more fragrant, but it didn’t make it shinier. So I give it four out of five stars.

Would I Use It Again?

Definitely. It already tamed my hair a bit after four weeks. I’m curious how my locks would fare if I continued using it for another month.

More than the frizz-fighting, though, I love devoting an extra ten minutes to take care of my hair. I’ve never really given my mane special attention, so using the mask twice a week was a much-needed pampering.

After all, our hair is our crowning glory. We should take the time to take care of it, even if it means applying luxurious, fragrant mud.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About The Author

Drinks an ungodly amount of coffee and eats an ungodly amount of chocolate. Up at an ungodly hour.

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