I Exfoliated for the First Time — and It Was Life-changing

Before I start, you should know two things:

One, I know very little about skin care. My nightly routine is limited to me rinsing off my makeup followed by a 30-second application of Cetaphil moisturizing lotion. Maybe a quick dab of the night cream that I got from my mom a few months ago, if I’m being good. I have psoriasis, so I have a personal obligation to keep my skin hydrated at all times. That’s it.

Second, the product in question (Kedma Exfoliating Facial Mask) was a random pick by Modern Filipina’s beauty team. I have no affiliation or loyalty to any brand. That’s because, as I’ve mentioned, I know little about skincare and beauty in general.

Given that I’m unburdened by skincare outside of psoriasis, I’d sidestepped the importance exfoliation altogether. In the few times that I did come across it, it had sounded like an over-advertised luxury that my dry, flaky skin didn’t need.

Two weeks ago, when the Modern Filipina beauty team was deliberating on new products to try, I chose Kedma Exfoliating Facial Mask off the list.  Only because it had Dead Sea minerals. If you’re psoriatic, anything with “sea” in it seems worth a try.

Two weeks into my new facial routine, I came face-to-face with a revelation: with the right product, exfoliation is one of the best things you can do for your skin.

Exfoliation: Out with the Old (Cells) and In with the New

The American Academy of Dermatology describes exfoliation as “the process of removing dead skin cells from the outer layer of your skin.” In effect, the skin looks more vibrant, more youthful, and less prone to acne breakouts. Exfoliation is just getting rid of old skin cells to make way for new, healthier cells.

The skin should do that naturally, but as we age, the process starts to slow down. Without a proactive effort to exfoliate, an excess of dead skin cells builds up on the surface of the skin, causing dullness and over-pigmentation.

Now, I admit I haven’t been particularly kind to my skin.

I’m lucky if I manage to wash off my makeup before collapsing into bed. Brownie points for any attempt to moisturize and hydrate.

Exfoliation? Forget it.

As it turns out, exfoliation isn’t just some “extra” step to your nightly routine; it’s a key piece to any beauty regimen in keeping the skin, well, alive.

But even with its potential benefits, the American Academy of Dermatology is quick to point out that exfoliation is not for everyone and some exfoliating products do more bad than good.

Truthfully, the image of “scraping off” dead skin did sound a bit too harsh for my taste (I’ve never had a facial in my life). But professionals claim it’s a matter of knowing which product does the most with the least amount of damage. And finding that product is how you make the most of your exfoliating routine.

The Exfoliant for Dry Skin

The first step to proper exfoliation is identifying your skin type: normal, dry, sensitive, oily, or combination. If you have dry skin like mine, the best product to use is a gentle, paraben-free exfoliant. For people with oily skin, a stronger exfoliant may be more effective.

I found my match in Kedma Exfoliating Face Mask. It contains Dead Sea minerals and plant extracts, which give it a gentle and natural exfoliating power.

Kedma Exfoliating Facial Mask; Contains Dead Sea Minerals and Plant Extracts (Photo by Author)

I’ve always been fascinated by the Dead Sea. In addition to the mystique that surrounds it, it’s said to have a long list of skin benefits.

Whenever I research about psoriasis-friendly beauty products, Dead Sea Salt always comes up. Experts claim that it gets its power from contents such as magnesium, zinc, potassium sodium, and calcium. These minerals slow down rapid cellular growth that causes the formation of plaque and ease inflammation. Using Dead Sea minerals can help slough away dead skin while providing the nutrients needed for healing.

Kedma’s strongest point is its use of Dead Sea minerals.

True enough, after I applied the mask, there was no sensation of irritation that I otherwise get from a scrub. The beads were gentle, and the smell was not as strong as I’d expected. I would’ve liked the formulation to be less thick and sticky, but the quick leave-on time (3-5 minutes) makes up for it.

Consistency of Kedma Exfoliating Face Mask; Thick and Greasy (Photo by Author)

Ingredients:

  • Dead Sea Minerals
  • Plant Extracts (Walnut Shell Powder, Jojoba Oil, and Chamomile Extract)

Ingredients of Kedma Exfoliating Face Mask; Dead Sea Minerals and Natural Extracts (Photo by Author)

Application:

  • Apply gently on the skin in even strokes.
  • Leave on for 3-5 minutes and wash off with water.
  • Apply 1-2 times a week.

Why Exfoliation Changed My Life

I’ve been exfoliating with Kedma for two weeks now, with a total of four applications spread out on Tuesdays and Fridays. And not to be dramatic, but I will never look back.

The deep cleaning has made me realize that 1.) my skin is gross and blanketed by dead skin, and 2.) scrubs aren’t the enemy.

My skin has never looked more vibrant or felt smoother, and my face feels rejuvenated all around. It’s almost as if exfoliating isn’t a luxurious skincare gimmick after all, but a must-have in your pre-existing regimen. Imagine that.

My psoriatic body is singing praises.

The key, really, is to know the exfoliant that best suits you, as is the golden rule of all skincare products.

Two Weeks After Using Kedma; Skin Looks Bright and Smooth (Photo by Author)

A Few Quick Reminders:

  • If you have a specific skin type, go out of your way to find the product that best protects it. There’s no tradeoff for health and safety.
  • Always rinse off your makeup before applying the exfoliant to ensure maximum absorption.
  • Always use gentle strokes.
  • If you have eczema, psoriasis, or any other special skin condition that you’re taking medication for, it’s best to talk to a dermatologist first before proceeding.

If your skin is reacting to the formulation, stop application immediately.

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